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Mrs. Lisa Haun » DISTANCE LEARNING

DISTANCE LEARNING

This Padlet link above will provide you with a wealth of resources to support learning at home.  You can bookmark it and show your child how to access the links on their own. Lots for parent support too.  In addition to online resources, there are off-line resources. I highly recommend exploring the podcasts - they are a great way to visualize, grow the mind, build listening comprehension, and disconnect from a screen.
 
RICHMOND STREET SCHOOL MYSTERY READERS!
Each week, a new read aloud and fun activity will be shared. 
To see the Read Alouds and activities and post your completed creations - visit our
 
Thank you for your time devote to the love of reading and building our community of readers! 
 
If you have any questions, please contact: Mrs. Haun - lhaun@esusd.k12.ca.us

To help motivate your child(ren) you might consider creating a reading goal or challenge at home.  It might be reading a certain number of books, increasing stamina with the number of minutes read each day, or making a list of books to check off.  The current goal with my girls is to read through the Land of Stories series and read at least 3 books made into a movie - book always first, followed by a fun movie night.  


Here are some incentive charts:

Stamina Chart

Minute Chart

50 Books - fill in the star for each book read

Read at Home Bingo

100 Book Scratch Off Poster - or make your own checklist!


Reading-rewards.com is a free online reading log and reading incentive program to encourage children to read. Parents set up custom rewards, which students will then ‘buy’ with earned RR Miles! 

If just reading with/to your child is what is working, that's great, keep that up! If you are looking for ways to provide more support, or don't know what to do, see below. Do NOT feel like you have to follow this guide, but see if there are any systems or strategies you might like to try.
 
Here are "cheat sheet" versions you can print out and have on hand. They do not include most the links included below.
 
 

ON MY OWN

WITH A PARENT

SIGHT WORDS

 

5-10 minutes

  • Use flashcards or Sight Word List
  • Set a timer and practice reading my sight words for 3 minutes
  • Click on a list to practice reading phrases quickly. (Click on Slide Show, From Beginning):
  • Review sight words - from list, flashcards, or select some words to support the new book read.
  • If a word is not read by sight (within 2-3 seconds), have your child say the names of the letters and tap it down their arm, trace it in the air, and trace it on the table/floor.
  • Play a quick, fun sight word game. 
 
Visit my website for lots of ideas and to print lists:
Watch this video for how to teach sight words and get ideas for quick, fun activities:

FLUENCY

Choose 1 book you have read before and RE-READ the book if short, or a few pages if longer

 

5-10 minutes

  • Option 1: Re-Read for 5 Minutes

Read smoothly. Use voices. Know the words by heart.

*Scoop words - don’t read word by word, chunk them into phrases

*Use expression - change my voice to sound like the character or show the character’s feelings

*Snap my eyes from one line to the next

*Pay attention to the punctuation and special print like bold words. 


  • Option 2: Re-Read with a fluent model

*Go to Raz and pick a book I have read. Record myself reading it if I am able.

*Read along with the audio recording. 

*Make sure my eyes are on the words - hear it, see it, and say it at the same time. 

* If I was able to record, play it back and listen to it and evaluate how I sound. Optionally use this chart

  • Option 1: Echo Read

*The adult reads a sentence with fluency.

*The child reads it again (eyes on text) - echo or parrot it back like the adult read it, with the same expression and fluency.

*Continue sentence by sentence for about 5 minutes.

Video of Echo Read

Video of Echo Read and Choral Read


  • Option 2: Re-Read with a fluent model (NIM)

*Hold the book together so you are able to both see the print, and the child is able to track with a finger. 

*Parent reads at a fluent pace (slightly slower than norm) and the child reads along at the same time, tracking the print.

*Set a timer and read straight through for 5 minutes together. Do not stop to make corrections, just read continuously together. Initially, the child may have trouble keeping up, but if you continue this practice he/she will start to improve their rate and catch up. 

Video modeling NIM.

Video modeling NIM.

READ A NEW BOOK

 

15 minutes

*Choose a new book from my reading folder, at home, or login to Raz or Epic.

*Set a timer and read for at least 15 minutes.

*If I finish the book, pick another one. 

If reading becomes a frustration…

*Try to help select a book that is a better “just right” fit. Contact the teacher if the Raz books aren’t a  good level. 

*Provide support like taking turns, or reading a page and having your child read it back. 

*Don’t correct every word and provide lots of praise. 

*Take a break - never let reading come to tears.

 

ON MY OWN

WITH A GROWN UP

BEFORE I READ

Preview the book. 

*Read the title, look at the cover -what does this tell me? What are some clues?

*Look at the illustrations. Notice the details. Think about what I see. 

*Predict what do I think will happen in this story? 

*Does this book remind me of anything I have seen or done before?

*Where is the story happening?

*What might be the problem?

*Share predictions and questions.

*Prompt with some of the questions and follow up with, “What makes you think that?”

*Model your own thinking and connections. You want to activate schema and build interest. 

*Flip through the pages. Use the language from the book to talk about the pictures and vocabulary. Be sure to use words you anticipate may be tricky - even point them out in the text before reading. 

DURING READING

Stop and think:

*What is happening so far?

*What do I think will happen next? How is this going to end?

*How do I feel about what is happening?

*What am I wondering?

*Why is the character doing that? What would I do?

*Is this making sense? Do I need to reread?

*What pictures can I see in my head?

*What details do I notice in the pictures?

*Stop at a couple places to talk about the book, model your thinking, or ask questions. Don’t spend too much time interrupting the flow of the story.

*Continue to ask things like, “What makes you think that?” or “Point to the part that lets you know.”

*Think out loud your ideas, the questions you have, and the pictures you see in your mind. 

*Take time to really look at the pictures and how they help build understanding.

***Explain vocabulary. Give examples and non-examples. 

WORD SOLVING

Use your strategies!

 

Here is a Guide to Coaching Young Readers - including graphic charts


If you get stuck, look at a chart and try a couple ways to see if you can figure it out. Be a Word Detective!  Use your Super Reader Powers! Roll Up Your Sleeves! 

*Give the child time to work through a word and try not to jump right in to correct. 

*If your child is stuck, use a strategy chart to encourage a strategy or reinforce ones used.

*If your child is unable to figure out the word after 1-3 prompts, say, “That word is ___. What is the word? Great, try that whole sentence again.”

*Pick your battles, if you child is frequently making errors, don’t stop to correct each one. If the error did not change the meaning, let it go. 

RETELL THE STORY

Retell across your fingers what happened in the story, starting with your thumb. 

 

Share with a stuffed animal or pet.

 

*Ask your child to retell what happened in the story.  You can say, “If your best friend/grandma/dad were to ask you what this book was about, what would you say?” 


*Use The Five Finger Retell to prompt if needed.


*Encourage your child to walk through the pictures if they need support. 

AFTER READING

Talk with someone at home, or share with a stuffed animal or pet. You can also think to yourself.

*What was my favorite part?

What was the big thing that happened?

*What did I think the author wanted me to learn? What was the message?

*Did I understand the story? Do I need to reread any parts?

*Did this book remind me of anything? Of another book?

*How did this book make me feel?

*Did anything surprise me? 

*Would I recommend this book to someone else? Why or why not?

*What am I still wondering?

What is the genre of this book? How do you know?

*Start with complimenting something specific your child did while reading.  Encourage him/her to continue to do that with any book they read. 

*Take turns sharing your thoughts about the book.  Try to make it more of a conversation vs. a grill session. 

*If you have books by the same author/series, compare/contrast them or how you got to know the characters better.

*Make a plan for the next book they might read or talk about a goal to work on. 

*Discuss: Fantasy - make believe, animals acting like humans,etc.  Realistic Fiction - It could happen, but the story is made up - the characters are not real. Both usually have a setting/problem/solution.

WRITE ABOUT WHAT YOU READ

*Draw a picture about the book. Add labels or write a sentence about it.

* Write your thoughts about the book or a connection you made.

*Divide your paper into 3 sections by drawing 3 lines spaced apart. In the first section draw/write what happened at the beginning, in the middle draw/write what happened in the middle, and in the last section draw/write what happened at the end.

*Divide your paper in half. On one side draw/write the problem. On the other side draw/write the solution.

*Draw a picture of a character. List words (character traits) to describe that character.

*Draw a picture of something you visualized. Write about it.

*Write: The author’s message was_____.

*Write about The Big Thing That Happened (TBTTH).

*Write about one thing you did well as a reader today.

*Write a reading goal you would like to work on.   

*Have the student freely write and get his/her thoughts down without worrying about conventional spelling.


*Help generate a sentence or two to write. For emerging writers, say the words across your fingers, or draw a line for each word on the paper. 


*Let the child sound out words and write down what they hear. You can assist with sounding out the word across their fingers. Provide support, such as how to spell a specific sound they may not know. 


*For younger students, you can do a guided writing - create a sentence that connects or follows the pattern from the story. Model writing out part  of a sentence, demonstrating how to form letters, spell, and space out words. Before you write a word, ask, what do you hear first? What do you hear next? Solicit help from the child as you write it down. Have the child copy it down in their book. Leave part of the sentence blank to fill in an idea on their own.  Sample: Meli hid under the ______. 


*Emergent Writer - The child can dictate a sentence. Write it with a highlighter. Have the child trace it.


*Ask the child to share what they wrote about and give a compliment. Give one suggestion for next time.

 

ON MY OWN

WITH A GROWN UP

BEFORE I READ

Preview the book. 

*Read the title, look at the cover,  table of contents, and illustrations. 

*What do I think I will be reading about?

*Read table of contents, headings, captions, or bold words. Look at any maps, charts, graphs.

What do I know about this topic?

What do I want to learn about this topic?

*Is there a glossary? What new words will I learn? 

*Discuss what you already know about the topic.

*Share predictions and questions.

*Point out and read over the headings, captions, bold words, glossary. Encourage the child to do this with every non-fiction book. 

*Skim the pages. Use the language from the book to talk about the pictures and vocabulary. Be sure to use words you anticipate may be tricky - even point them out in the text before reading. Front-load unknown vocabulary words. 

DURING READING

Stop and think:

*What is important so far?

*What was this part about?

*What am I wondering?

*Is there information that fits with what I already know? 

*Is this making sense? Do I need to reread?

*What pictures can I see in my head?

*What details do I notice in the pictures?

*What do I think will happen next?

*I wonder why…? I’m curious about…?

*Talk about headings & text features and how it prepares your brain for each section. 

*Stop at a couple places to talk about the book, share thinking, or wonderings.

*Continue to ask things like, “What makes you think that?” or “Point to the part that lets you know.”

*Think out loud your ideas, the questions you have, and the pictures you see in your mind. 

*Take time to really talk about the photos, captions, maps, graphs, etc. & how they build understanding.

***Explain vocabulary. Give examples and non-examples. 

WORD SOLVING

Use your strategies!

(print and use a chart)

Lucy Calkins/Readers Workshop

 

Word Detective 


If you get stuck, look at a chart and try a couple ways to see if you can figure it out. Be a Word Detective!  Use your Super Reader Powers! Roll Up Your Sleeves! 

*Give the child time to work through a word and try not to jump right in to correct. 

*If your child is stuck, use a strategy chart to encourage a strategy or reinforce ones used.

*If your child is unable to figure out the word after 1-3 prompts, say, “That word is ___. What is the word? Great, try that whole sentence again.”

*Pick your battles, if you child is frequently making errors, don’t stop to correct each one. If the error did not change the meaning, let it go. 

RETELL THE STORY

Share with a stuffed animal or pet.

 

Nonfiction Retelling Hand

 

 

Can You Retell a Story Snowman

*Ask your child to retell what happened in the story.  


*Tap the middle of the palm and start with the topic. Then list as many facts as you can across your fingers. You can do this for each chapter or section for longer books.


*Encourage your child to walk through the pictures if they need support. 

AFTER READING

Talk with someone at home, or share with a stuffed animal or pet. You can also think to yourself.

Think to yourself or share with a stuffy:

*Was my prediction correct?

*What information did I already know?

*What did I learn?

What was the main idea? What was this mostly about?

*Why did the author write this book?

*Why is this information important?

*What new words did I learn?

*Did I understand the book? Do I need to reread any parts?

*Did anything surprise me?

*What did I find  most interesting? 

*Would I recommend this book to someone else? Why or why not?

*What am I still wondering? What else do I want to learn about this topic?

*What is the genre of this book? 

*Start with complimenting something specific your child did while reading.  Encourage him/her to continue to do that with any book they read. 


*Talk about what the author did to build understanding - photos, graphs, how the book was organized, bold vocabulary/glossary, captions, grahs, maps, diagrams, etc. Teach these key words.


*Take turns sharing your thoughts about the book.  Try to make it more of a conversation vs. a grill session. 


*Share opinions vs. facts. 


*Discuss that makes this book Non-Fiction - It gives TRUE information. Text features - real photos, etc.


*Make a plan for the next book they might read or talk about a goal to work on. 

WRITE ABOUT WHAT YOU READ

*Draw a picture about the book. Add labels or write a sentence about it.


* Write 2-3 new facts you learned.


*Make a list of new words you learned. Illustrate them.


*Write about what you are still wondering.


*Write about what was most interesting or surprising.


*Draw a picture of something you visualized. Write about it.


*Write: The author’s message was_____.


*Write 2-3 questions about this topic and give your quiz to someone. 


*Create a diagram/graph/map about what you learned.


*Draw a picture and write a caption for it.


*Write about one thing you did well as a reader today.


*Write a reading goal you would like to work on.   

*Have the student freely write and get his/her thoughts down without worrying about conventional spelling.


*Help generate a sentence or two to write. For emerging writers, say the words across your fingers, or draw a line for each word on the paper. 


*Let the child sound out words and write down what they hear. You can assist with sounding out the word across their fingers. Provide support, such as how to spell a specific sound they may not know. 


*For younger students, you can do a guided writing - create a sentence that connects or follows the pattern from the story. Model writing out part  of a sentence, demonstrating how to form letters, spell, and space out words. Before you write a word, ask, what do you hear first? What do you hear next? Solicit help from the child as you write it down.Have the child copy it down in their book. Leave part of the sentence blank to fill in an idea on their own.  Sample: When Panda was one____


*Emergent Writer - The child can dictate a sentence. Write it in a highlighter. Have the child trace it.


*Ask the child to share what they wrote about and give a compliment. Give one suggestion for next time.

The district is committed to providing intervention to children amidst this school closure. Your child will be using Lexia Reading Core5®  Reading, a fun, research-based program that has helped millions of students at all reading levels. The activities in Core5 support and build on our classroom curriculum and focus on developing reading skills in six areas: phonological awareness, phonics, structural analysis, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. Lexia Core5 will be the PRIMARY intervention that we hope you utilize to support your child's growth as a reader during this time. 

IMPORTANT:

*Your child begins Core5 with an assessment, to start at a point that fits his/her needs and works in online activities throughout the week. 

*PLEASE limit sessions to 20 minutes, working INDEPENDENTLY. (There will be a progress bar on your child’s screen. If it appears yellow, you can assist your child.)  

Your child can log-on any day of the week but the program is intended for no more than 20 minutes per day, with a max of 140 min per week. If your child sees a red apple icon on the screen, it means it is time to take a break and do something else.

*Be sure to LOG OUT of the program by clicking Exit so that your child’s work is captured and saved. 

*It is recommended your child wear headphones, if you have them. 

 

HOW LEXIA CORE5 WORKS:

  • Online activities include direct instruction and feedback as your child learns skills.
  • Progress and performance in the program will be reported to me to monitor and to provide additional teaching. I will be checking these reports regularly and sending email updates.
  • Mid-week reports will help me know what specific instruction to send to the students in video or pdf form
  • Optional follow-up paper-and-pencil activities may be sent
  • I will share Achievement Certificates to celebrate your child’s success
 

LET’S GET STARTED! 

  1. To use on a computer, go to http://www.lexiacore5.com/?SiteID=2209-4818-3335-7343
  2. To use on an iPad, download the free Lexia Core5 Reading app from the App Store. (compatible device and internet access required.)
  3. The first time your child uses Core5 on an iPad, you may need to enter the teacher email shown below. Your child can then log in with the username and password format listed below.
    1. If you do not know this number, please let me know!
    1. lhaun@esusd.k12.c.aus
    2. Username: student 5 digit ID (lunch number) *
    3. Password: (contact me)

I understand that we are all enduring incredibly stressful times, within our own homes and outside our homes. Everyone is going through varying levels of chaos - in part because most are literally being asked to fly a plane while we build it!  Ha! Our kids have had their worlds turned upside down as well.  These are not conditions conducive to learning. So I will continue to emphasize - please do what’s in the best interest of your family and your well-being in regards to schoolwork. The most important thing you can give your child(ren) is your sustained attention and company. I know, easier said than done, but a good mantra!

 

If someone hasn’t told you, YOU are doing a good job!  If you read with your child, or to your child, or they picked up a book and read on their own, consider that a success!  

 

In this article - 8 Ways to Make the Best of This For Our Kids - they write the following...“The number one way to help your child avoid a backwards slide from this time from their classroom is to read.  Read in front of them, read with them, have them read to you, read read read.  Read what you have available and reread it too. Kids often read the same books over and over because the familiarity feels comforting.  You could read a novel to them, yes even the little ones will enjoy curling up and listening to your voice even if they don’t comprehend it.  You could fold up some papers and write a book with the kids to read…” 

 

Please keep this in mind when trying to prioritize what to do at home.  I will continue to message above all else - just read as often as possible! :)

Visit the Padlet Link Above - Resources Galore for access to online books, magazines, read alouds, and recommended book lists.

Happy Reading together!

Create a small group and have the members select a book to read - use Epic or Libby.
 
Each child in the group can be the "host." The host makes the final decision on the book, creates the Zoom or Skype meeting(s), and perhaps thinks of a culminating activity.
 
Set goals prior to each meeting - agree on number of pages or chapters to read before the meeting. 
 
Have fun talking about the book.  Use these Discussion Cards to guide talk around any book.
 
Here are a couple articles for more tips: